Academics

305 posts

Review of The Proselyte and the Prophet

The first review of my book on Targum Ruth, The Proselyte and the Prophet, came out this week on Reading Religion. Steven Fassberg offered a very gracious summary and review of the book while providing context for the study of the Targumim of the Megilloth. Please read it all, but to keep the suspense from building any longer, here are some of his concluding words. As much as the book is about the Targum Ruth, it […]

Lectionary Sermon Preparation Resources

My good friend and fellow scholar and clergy member Dr. Richard Wright has started a new(ish) blog with Greek and Hebrew resources following the Lectionary, Plenum creaturis. Rick has provided notes on the Hebrew (Aramaic) and Greek texts assigned for the given week based upon the Revised Common Lectionary. It is well worth looking at and a great help for those whose seminary training included little language instruction. This should be on every preacher’s blogroll […]

IOTS 2018 – Targum Lamentations 1:15 and Isaiah 63:3

In a couple of weeks I will heading out to London to join with other Targum scholars for IOTS 2018. I am returning to TgLam for a short note on the relationship between the Targum and Isa. 63:3. This is my proposal. “The Lord has trodden as in a wine press,” A note regarding TgLam 1:15 and Isa. 63:3 The biblical text of Lamentations is already a rather graphic and dramatic passage: Lam. 1:15 The […]

On laughing at students’ mistakes | Remnant of Giants

Deane is absolutely right. It has always rubbed me the wrong way. Very similar to the way in which “Dean Dad,” a community college dean who blogs anonymously, would openly mock or criticize his faculty and others who were in their community. Oddly enough, Inside Higher Ed decided to make him a regularly contributor. Dean’s quote below reminds me of a favorite admonition. “Never make for of someone for mispronouncing a word. It means they […]

Congratulations to Jeremy Schipper!

Kudos to Jeremy Schipper of Temple U,  a friend and colleague who is very deserving of being awarded a 2018 Guggenheim Fellowship! As a Guggenheim Fellow, Schipper will be writing a book currently titled Demark Vesey’s Bible: Biblical Interpretation and the Trial that Changed a Nation. In 1822, Denmark Vesey, a formerly enslaved man of African descent, was convicted of plotting an insurrection in Charleston, South Carolina. The book focuses on uses of biblical texts […]

Moving from Sente to EndNote (with screenshots)

In a previous post (Sente is (long) dead, long live EndNote?) I wrote about the fact that Sente, the bibliographic database solution I had espoused is now defunct and that I had moved over to EndNote. (And I feel horrible about that! Coincidentally a former PSU student of mine just emailed me to say that she just found out that Sente was dead, just as she was starting her doctoral research! Better now than later, […]

Sente is (long) dead, long live EndNote?

Several years ago I wrote about seeking a bibliographic software. I had been using EndNote for years, but I wanted a solution that would allow me to archive and annotate PDFs while also having access to them on the iPad. I chose the “walled garden” of Sente. It was well integrated, had server support, and required little work on my part to keep it up. The latter was in distinction from various other solutions at […]

Cognitive Offloading in Biblical Scholarship

It has been years since I have posted anything within the Biblioblogosphere echo chamber. (Hello? Is anyone still reading?) But this weekend I noticed a new “service” for biblical scholars. The Expurgated Review of Biblical Literature is “a community project of the Society of the Blessed St. José Buenaventura Durruti (SBSJB).” Durruti was a Spanish anarchist and I assume the Society is a sarcastic fiction. I like that touch! The purpose of the site is […]

Lancelot of Andrewes, with Thanksgiving

I admit my own ignorance, I have never known about this cleric and scholar until today. The Commemoration for Morning Prayer was for Lancelot Andrewes (1555-1626), Bishop of Winchester. His feast day was the 25th of September. [Andrewes] was on the committee of scholars that produced the King James Translation of the Bible, and probably contributed more to that work than any other single person. It is accordingly no surprise to find him not only a […]

The Illumination of Archaeology

Recently (July 2017) there was a story about “ancient Canaanite DNA” disproves the Bible. For example, The Independent in the UK had this headline: “Bible says Canaanites were wiped out by Israelites but scientists just found their descendants living in Lebanon.” Except, of course, that the Bible says no such thing. This comes up with reasonable frequency, some discovery offers interesting insight into the world of the ancient Levant, but in order get clicks and sell stories they are framed […]