SBL Paper – “God is not in this classroom” 6


(Just reposting to make sure it shows up in iTunes.)
My paper went fairly well (or at least, that is what people told me 😉 ) and the sessions were even better. I really enjoyed them and the afternoon session was packed. Kevin Wilson and Steve Cook were there! It was great to meet them in person. I look forward to meeting more of the bibliobloggers this afternoon.

I read the paper from my computer (first time I have ever closed down a bar and it was with a cup of coffee and my MacBook while writing the paper Friday night). As a result I was able to record my talk with the built in mic and GarageBand. You can listen to it below. You can read an earlier draft of it here.

 

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6 thoughts on “SBL Paper – “God is not in this classroom”

  • Steve

    Congrats on a successful reading.

    This was interesting to me. I am assuming it is standard practice to “read” your paper? In most of my dealings with presentations in my disciplines, while we are technically “presenting a paper” it is usually treated as a different medium, and thus done in a more presentation style. Of course, this has the (often abysmal) result of us relying (and *gasp* reading) PowerPoint summaries of our research findings.

    Just curious, since I have obviously not attended conferences in your discipline.

    Steve

  • cbrady

    Yes, we write a paper, often hoping/expecting that it will be published as an article in a journal, and then read it. I hope it came through in the recording that I try and be somewhat dynamic in presenting my paper. (How is the quality?) We did have one PPT that was a summary of a survey of students and their attitudes towards Biblical Studies courses.

    There are some sessions where the presenters have to submit their papers in advance and they are made available online so that we can read them ahead of time. They then present a 10 minute summary of the argument and we have discussion. There is also a trend to have a respondent, as this session had, to help craft discussion, but I actually prefer when we open upon discussion to the entire group. It tends to be far more profitable.

  • Steve

    Interesting. It is different from my experience, obviously, different disciplines take varied approaches to not only scholarly efforts, but also in how we present and share those outputs.

    Thanks for sharing.